2012年01月29日

バターン原発訪問記

  稼働中止になったバターン原発
       訪問記(2012年1月20日) 

〜世界で唯一、実物を見ることができる原発〜
  
          日本国際法律家協会事務局長 笹本 潤


 
           
IMG_2405.JPG


@2012年1月20日、マニラのあるルソン島の西海岸にあるバターン原発(Bataan)を見学した。
首都マニラから約80kmのところにある。
東京と福島の距離よりも近い位置に原発があるわけだ。

     IMG_2563.JPG

フィリピンに原発が導入されたのは1964年。
IAEA(国際原子力機関)がマルコス大統領に建設を勧めた。
その後、73年のオイルショックを機に建設が始まったが、79年のスリーマイル島の原発事故で工事が中断。
86年にはチェルノブイリの事故が起き、マルコス政権も崩壊したので、ピープルズパワーで誕生したコラソン・アキノ大統領が原発の閉鎖を決断した。
それ以来、施設の閉鎖が続いている。
一度導入した原発の燃料もドイツに売却して、今は設備だけが残っている。

Aバターンの原発は、福島原発と違い原子炉の中で水を沸騰させない「加圧水型」原発だ。
左がバターン原発、右が福島原発。

    IMG_2431.JPG

Bバターン原発の見学は、建設当初からの作業員のレイナルド・プンザランさんが詳しく説明してくれた。
写真は建設が始まった当時の写真。福島原発の開発時に同じような写真を見たことがある。

    IMG_2414.JPG


C写真が外から見た使用済み燃料プール。
  
  IMG_2421.JPG
 
D原発の仕組みは、原子炉での熱い温度で水を沸騰させ、その蒸気の力でタービンを回し発電するというもの。使われた蒸気は海水で冷やされ再び蒸気発生器に循環されて使用される。福島原発と違って原子炉内に水が入ることはない。蒸気発生器から出てきた水が海水によって冷やされる配管がたくさんある部屋。巨大なパイプを見ることができた。

  IMG_2427.JPG  IMG_2430.JPG  IMG_2425.JPG

E格納容器の中に入るためには、2重になっている厳重な扉を通過する。

  IMG_2443.JPG


Fいよいよ格納容器の中に。正面に見えるのが、原子炉本体。移動用のクレーンからの撮影のため少し見えにくい。

  IMG_2445.JPG    IMG_2452.JPG

G手前に見える針状に下から突き出ているものが制御棒。その上に見えている銀色の輪に、原子炉をクレーンで移動しておく予定だったという。 

  IMG_2455.JPG

Hベント用に水素を外に抜く穴がある。壁には水素コントロールと書いてある。

  IMG_2462.JPG    IMG_2461.JPG

I使用済み燃料プール。水は入っていないが、四角い管に使用済み燃料が
100本単位で入っている。それがさらに何十本集まって、水の入るプールに入れられる。
人を載せるクレーンで真上まで行って、見たところが右の写真。

IMG_2480.JPGIMG_2485.JPG

   
                                 

                          
  
   
   






IMG_2491.JPGJ単位となっている四角い管を近くから見たところ。
ここに直径数センチの燃料棒がたくさん入るとのこと。










K原発が稼働していないから中央制御室にも入ることができる。
しかし、再稼働もあり得るから、今でも厳重な管理が行われている。

IMG_2473.JPGIMG_2477.JPG




    








Lこれがタービンと発電機の図。ここで原子力が電気に転化する。

          手前が発電機。奥の四角のものがタービン。
          

IMG_2500.JPGIMG_2499.JPG











IMG_2496.JPG

Mバターン原発の設備はすべてウエスティングハウス社製のもの。










N発電施設の窓からは海が見える。こんなに海と近いのだ。
津波対策はどうなっているのか。IMG_2492.JPG 



 




O事故時の放射能の飛ぶ範囲。現地のNGOが作成したマップだ。
  

50km拡散した場合。      200km拡散した場合。
                   マニラまで全部放射能で覆われることになる。

IMG_2345.JPG

IMG_2346.JPG

     








P1980年代に閉鎖が決まったバターン原発だが、今でも導入の動きは続いている。説明してくれたレイナルドさんも、安全性を強調していて、ちょうど帰ろうとしている時に政府の役人も現地に来た。日本人には特に福島原発との違いを強調して、原発の安全性を強調しているようだ。

 私たちは、使われるかもしれない「本物の原発」を見ることができた。福島の経験からすると、こんな恐ろしいものを再開させてはなるまい。現地のNGOもさらなる監視と運動が必要だと訴えている。 
(バターン原発訪問記・2012年1月29日記)

posted by peaceconstitution at 15:42| フィリピン | このブログの読者になる | 更新情報をチェックする

2010年08月27日

コスタリカの軍事化の危険

The Lowest Form Of Military Aggression
The Lowest Form Of Military Aggression – CIP Americas  By Luis Roberto Zamora Bolaños
US vessel2.jpg

On July 1, 2010, Costa Rica’s Legislative Assembly authorized the U.S. military to undertake policing duties in Costa Rica, based on an expired “Cooperation Agreement.” Just one small problem: Costa Rica abolished its army in 1949 and since then has had no national military forces.Costa Rica is world-renowned for its natural environment, its political and democratic stability in a region of conflict, it’s commitment to protecting human rights, and its peaceful and unarmed neutrality in foreign affairs.Throughout ithe country’s history since independence, Costa Rica has distanced itself from the power struggles in the region, with only occasional exceptions, including the U.S. invasion in 1856. The country has grown alongside increasing indices of human development, which by the 1980s had nearly reached First World levels.In 1949, after its last internal conflicts, Costa Rica established a new republic. The Constitution prohibited an army and delegated the power to “monitor and maintain public order” exclusively to civilian police forces. The country became a leader in promoting human rights and the American Convention on Human Rights was signed in San Jose, Costa Rica in 1969.Later the Cold War turned hot in Central America and spread throughout the isthmus. In the middle of pressure from the Nicaraguan Sandinistas and the contras (counter-revolutionary forces) trained by the CIA, then-President Luis Alberto Monge proceeded in November of 1983 to declare the permanent, unarmed neutrality of Costa Rica vis a vis the violent conflicts of other nations. This enabled the country to maintain peace in the midst of the wars and conflicts of its neighbors, and to continue to develop within a region that was collapsing.Recently, Costa Rica became the first country in the world to recognize and declare the Right to Peace. Remarkably, this happened in the midst of a process of destruction of the judicial apparatus that the government of Oscar Arias put into practice, for which Costa Rica has been reported to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights under charges of judicial bias in favor of former President Arias, his families and policies. The Right to Peace declaration was the result of two cases brought by the author before the Constitutional Chamber of the Supreme Court of Justice.The first case challenged the Costa Rican government’s support for the coalition that invaded Iraq in 2003. In this case, the Court annulled the support, stating it violated the commitment to neutrality because it was a unilateral act. It also declared that support for the U.S. invasion violated the United Nations Charter and contradicted a fundamental principle of “the Costa Rican identity”, which is peace as a fundamental value. Never before had the court annulled the support of a government for an invasion.The second case filed in October of 2008 concerns a decree issued by Oscar Arias–a Nobel Peace Prize recipient–that authorized the extraction of thorium and uranium, nuclear fuel development and the manufacture of nuclear reactors “for all purposes.” The Court annulled the contested decree, recognizing the existence of a Right to Peace, which had been violated by the decree due to the fact that it contained elements directly related to the “anti-value” of war.The “Right to Peace” imposes both positive and negative obligations on the State. Positively, the State must promote international peace; negatively, the State must refrain from authorizing war-related activities, including entry, production, purchase, sale, storage, import, export, etc., of items, goods or services made or intended to be used in a war. The Constitutional Court of Costa Rica issued this decision.Apart from the Costa Rican history, the world has been affected by multiple problems, among them drug trafficking. Unfortunately, in today’s world with today’s politicians and their way of conducting what Plato called “the art of governing,” drug trafficking has become a convenient “security excuse” for achieving their own economic or hegemonic imperialist purposes.Despite its legal obligations to peace, Costa Rica has not been an exception to the rule. It simply needed a few servile puppet governments willing to do anything for their own interests and that of their boss, to trample and destroy the achievements of the sovereign people won through democratic struggles and within the institutional framework.The permission granted by the legislature to the United States military is based on an agreement for joint maritime patrols between the U.S. and Costa Rica that expired in October 2009. This permit that ended in 2009 only allow for Coast Guard patrols and never authorized the entry of the United States military personnel and only covered coast guard missions.However, the Legislature has now authorized the entry of 12,207 U.S. soldiers and 46 military vessels, 45 armed with artillery. Forty-three of these are warships similar to the “Oliver Hazard Perry.”  The ships carry 180 Sikorsky Blackhawk helicopters in the SH-60 and MH-60 categories designed primarily for anti-submarine warfare, anti-surface warfare, naval special warfare, combat search and rescue, among others.In addition to the exorbitant sum of 180 helicopters, the entry of ten McDonnell Douglas (Boeing) AV-8B Harrier II aircraft carriers was authorized. These are land attack planes (for supposed sea operations?) that can carry on board 25 mm. Equalizer GAU-12 machine guns, four 70 mm. LAU-5003 rocket launchers with a capacity of 19 CRV7 rockets, and six AGM-65 Maverick missiles or two AGM-84 Harpoon or two AGM-88 HARM. These ships may also carry CDU-100 cluster bombs, Mark 80 unguided bombs, Paveway laser-guided bombs or Mark 77 napalm bombs.The agreement also grants permission for aircraft carriers such as the “Wasp amphibious attack,” which are specifically assault ships.Everything on the list of ships, aircraft, helicopters and troops detailed above is designed and intended to be used in a war. Therefore, they cannot be deployed in our country because the negative obligation requires the State to reject them as elements that are counter to and in violation of the Right to Peace.The U.S. Embassy in Costa Rica says there is no problem because the United States will not send all the equipment authorized. Two points are important here. First, I do not believe the U.S. ambassador’s word on this. Second, the problem is not what the U.S. sends; the problem is a domestic one, lying in what was authorized to enter and operate within the country.Despite the legal limitations in the country, and despite a constitutional obligation to invest only civilian police with the duties of monitoring and enforcing our public order, the submissive legislative assembly–dominated by the ruling parties–is allowing the U.S. military to play war games on our sovereign land as if it were a game of chess.As a Costa Rican, the saddest part of this situation, besides the destruction of our history, is that we’re going to militarize the country with foreign armies to protect the Colombian drugs and Venezuelan oil that the United States consumes. If the U.S. government’s purpose was really to eliminate the drug problem, it would attack the problem where drugs are grown or in countries closer to production. The “war on drugs” is nothing more than an excuse for ulterior motives. If there is a battle, the free soil of this country of peace−a nation with no army and a pledge to neutrality−will enable and facilitate the return of the Cold War that the United States so badly needs for its survival.The whole situation is grotesque, to me the lowest form of military aggression in modern times.Luis Roberto Zamora Bolaños is a trial lawyer in his hometown Heredia, Costa Rica. He received his degree in Law from the University of Costa Rica, has litigated in promoting the Right to Peace, achieving constitutional recognition in 2008. Prior to that, he successfully went to the Supreme Court to force his country to withdraw the support given to the coalition invasion of Iraq. Since 2005 he has participated in forums and conferences in promoting the Right to Peace, including the World Peace Forum in Vancouver 2005, the World Social Forum 2007 in Nairobi, the 62 UN DPI Conference on Disarmament, in Mexico in 2009, the Conference on the 60th anniversary of the Stockholm Declaration of 2010 on nuclear disarmament in Paris, among others. Parallel to his work as a trial lawyer, Zamora works pro-bono for peace related issues. Currently he is involved as an expert on the right to peace and nuclear disarmament in international forums.Translator: Verona FonteEditor: Laura Carlse
 
posted by peaceconstitution at 12:38| Comment(0) | コスタリカの政治情勢 | このブログの読者になる | 更新情報をチェックする

2008年09月24日

国際平和デー

21-09-08_1230.jpg

 9月21日日曜日は国際平和デーの日でした。
 コスタリカでも、自動車に風船を付けたパレードや文化広場という中心地で戦争のない世界を!や暴力のない世界を!の企画が行われていました。

.
posted by peaceconstitution at 00:28| Comment(0) | コスタリカの政治情勢 | このブログの読者になる | 更新情報をチェックする

2008年06月26日

コスタリカの住宅街




 コスタリカの家は道路に面してほとんどの家が鉄格子ならぬ頑丈な鉄柵がついている。まるでそれぞれの家が牢獄に入っているような風景だ。子どもが車のガレージで遊んでいると、まるで刑務所の檻の中で遊んでいるように見える。
 ニカラグア、コロンビアの難民が多く、犯罪も多発しているからと言う。来る前に予想していたコスタリカとは大違いの風景にまずびっくりした。
 私のホームステイ先も玄関のドアに入るまでに二重の鉄柵がありそれぞれ鍵がかかるようになっている。すごく面倒くさいけれども、現地の人はきっと犯罪で痛い目に遭っているのだろう。それが当然として生活しているのである。

posted by peaceconstitution at 02:19| コスタリカの政治情勢 | このブログの読者になる | 更新情報をチェックする
×

この広告は1年以上新しい記事の投稿がないブログに表示されております。